Arkema, CEA to collaborate for micro- and organic electronics

27-Apr-12
Arkema and CEA have developed their collaboration to go outside of the PV field and into the micro-electronics and organic electronics sectors with the creation of two joint research laboratories. The CEA-Leti and CEA-Liten labs aim to develop new high-performance materials and manufacturing processes for France’s electronics market. The labs will tap into Arkema’s design and production of high performance polymers and polymer nanostructuring, combined with CEA researchers’ background with the design and processes for the development of electronic components, to reach an ultimate goal of producing new materials that will better the performances of silicon components and reduce their manufacturing costs in next generation integrated circuits. “These partnerships between Arkema and CEA are ideally suited to the development of new materials used in lithography and in organic electronics. These collaborations also illustrate a new focus of research for our Group, namely micro-electronics, and are a tangible demonstration of our ability to innovate in high added value application areas,” stated Christian Collette, Vice President Research & Development at Arkema. As part of its collaboration with Leti, Arkema will draw on its expertise in polymer nanostructuring to produce new materials designed to optimize the performances of silicon components and significantly reduce their manufacturing costs in next generation integrated circuits. As part of its collaboration with Liten, Arkema, which markets a group of leading technical polymers (fluorinated, piezoelectric, nanostructured thermoplastic polymers), will be able to meet the technological challenges of the large-area printed electronics sector (flexible screens, intelligent packaging and textiles, photovoltaic panels), such as lifetime of the systems, cost of manufacture, and integration of several functions onto a single support. In fact, the use of organic materials, rather than silicon, opens up a new field of printable, transparent and flexible components that can be integrated into large-area printed electronic products.
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